Despite steep streets, Akureyri is a bike-friendly town with a growing network of paths connecting the Eyja Fjord region.

Getting around Akureyri

Home to about 20,000 people, Akureyri is Iceland’s largest town outside the southwestern Capital Region, situated along the Ring Road. 

The town is set by the foot of a mountain, with a steep street known as Gilið, ‘the Pass’, extending from the heart of downtown (there is literally a giant heart-sculpture). Here are some top-tips for a smooth visit.

Stræto buses in Akureyri

The main bus stop is by the crossing of Strandagata and Glerárgata street, opposite the road from Hof Culture Center.

Public Transport in Akureyri 

The best thing about Akureyri’s yellow buses is the admission: they are free for everyone! On weekdays, buses run from 6.30am to 11pm. The frequency of rides drops considerably on weekends. Visit Straeto.is for a route planner. 

Akureyri city buses run under the umbrella of Strætó, Iceland’s vast public transport network, also connecting the ins and outs of Reykjavík. 

The main bus stop is by the crossing of Strandagata and Glerárgata street, opposite the road from Hof Culture Center and Tourist Information. (Another bus stop, closer to Hof, serves Strætó buses departing to Reykjavík.) 

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Route 1 (the Ring Rd) by Hof Culture Centre pass the large parking lots for downtown.

Parking 

The city of Akureyri recently introduced a parking fee for downtown. Paying via an app is considered the default option, but parking tickets are sold at a vending machine on the main lot between Skipagata and Glerárgata. Download either of these two service providers for mobile payments:

EasyPark

and

Parka

Plenty of free parking options still remain, such as by the public pool. 

Akureyri Airport

Akureyri Airport has no public transport; walk or call a taxi.

Getting to and from Akureyri Airport 

City buses do not run to and from the airport in Akureyri. The closest bus stop is by the Skautahöllinn (ice skating center) some 15 minute walk from the airport towards town. Walking to the city center takes about 45 minutes. 

Call 461 1010 for a taxi; if there is none waiting outside the airport. Contact

BSO Taxi

for planned arrangements.

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Many sidewalks in Akureyri are geothermal heated for winter access.

Electric scooters

Hopp

, the scooter rental service, operates a large, bright-green fleet on the streets of Akureyri. To locate and access one, download the Hopp app. Expect to pay around 1000 Krona for rides within the downtown area. 

Helmets are harder to find, however, and legally riders aged 16 or younger have to wear one.

Akureyri Church

Taking the 96 steps leading to the landmark church is part the Akureyri experience.

Walking and accessibility 

Akureyri’s iconic church famously has 96 steps; getting around is often an uphill battle. Yet, most of Akureyri’s city center is on the coastal landform around Route 1 (the Ring Rd) and thus completely flat. 

In recent years, many businesses along the Hafnarstræti shopping street have improved wheelchair accessibility with support from the campaign “

Ramp up Iceland

” founded by Icelandic philanthropist Haraldur Þorleifsson. 

Kjarnaskógur cycling

Family fun on the mountain biking tracks in Kjarnaskógur forest.

Cycling

Despite steep streets, Akureyri is a bike-friendly town with a growing network of paths connecting the Eyja Fjord region.

As a sport, the hills of Hlíðarfjall and Kjarnaskógur forest have excellent

mountain biking tracks

.

Racer cyclists (the once in spandex clothing) train along the flat coastline, with a smooth 14km path running between Hof Culture House to Hrafnagil. On the other side of the Eyja Fjord, a 2km forest path goes from the Forest Lagoon to Vaðlaheiði.

To rent a bike, check out

Skíðaþjónustan

.

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Getting around Akureyri: Free buses and electric scooters