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INTRODUCING ICELAND ACADEMY

Iceland is an amazing country filled with beautiful nature, wonderful food, and inspiring art and culture. And at the Iceland Academy we want to help you get the most of it. Our unique online programme has been specially designed to teach you the essentials of Iceland. So by the end of term you’ll be able to travel, eat, and even shower like a local. 

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Explore the regions of Iceland

East Iceland

The east coast of Iceland is home to the country's largest forest, lush farmlands and a range of small fjords and islands. Thanks to the East's many natural harbors, a variety of fishing villages and small seaside communities border the coast.

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West Iceland

The western peninsula is one of Iceland's most geologically diverse regions. Its natural wonders are a nearly exhaustive sampling of all that Iceland has to offer, ranging from slumbering volcanoes and majestic waterfalls to a variety of flora and wildlife.

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Westfjords

One of Iceland's best kept secrets is undoubtedly the country's North-West corner, usually known as the Westfjords. Isolation has preserved the region in relatively unspoiled wilderness. Largely uninhabited, the Westfjords are frequently distinguished by travel guides as a destination of excellence, and are a must-see for any serious explorer.

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South

The south coast of Iceland is home to some the country's most visited tourist attractions. The coastline itself is renowned for its beauty, and the towns along the coast are famous for their fresh seafood.

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Reykjanes

The Reykjanes Peninsula is a geothermal wonder, where lighthouses outnumber villages. Besides hosting the Keflavík International Airport and, just a few minutes away, the spectacular Blue Lagoon, the Reykjanes Peninsula is a destination in its own right.

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Reykjavík

Reykjavík is the natural starting point for any visit to Iceland, and not undeservedly so. The capital city is world-renowned on all fronts; for its culture, history, and natural beauty.

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Highlands

For centuries, the interior of Iceland was virtually inaccessible, for years at a time playing host only to outlaws in hiding. Via the mountain roads Kjölur and Sprengisandur, the untouched wilderness of Iceland's mountainous centre is now open to the general public—for cautious exploration by foot or 4x4 vehiclesin the summer months.

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North Iceland

The north of Iceland is truly a place of contrasts. Its long valleys and peninsulas are interspersed with mountains, lava fields and smooth hills carved out by rivers. As one nears the Arctic Circle in the northern latitudes, the midnight sun is invariably awe-inspiring.

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Get to know Iceland

History

The history of Iceland is one of survival and prosperity. The country was settled by Norsemen from Scandinavia and Celts from the British Isles in the 9th and 10th centuries, who established the world's first parliament. The Old Commonwealth Age, described in the classic Icelandic Sagas, lasted until 1262, when Iceland lost its independence. The present republic was founded in 1944.

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Geography

Iceland was formed around 25 million years ago, which makes it one of the youngest landmasses on the planet. Learn more about Icelandic geography and geology here. 

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Practical Info

Need information on what to wear? Visa regulations or driving conditions? 

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Facts and Figures

Iceland by numbers. Quickly scan the most important facts and figures for Iceland.

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People and Language

Iceland was the last country to be settled in Europe, when emigrants from Scandinavia and the British Isles first came to live on the island in the ninth and tenth century. It remains the most sparsely populated country of the continent with less than three inhabitants per square kilometer. 

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Get to Know Iceland

Iceland is a country of extreme contrasts. Widely known as "The Land of Fire and Ice", Iceland is home to some of the largest glaciers in Europe, and some of the world's most active volcanoes. Iceland is also the land of light and darkness. Long summer days with near 24-hours of sunshine are offset by short winter days with only few hours of daylight.

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Iceland Is a Safe Place to Visit

Iceland is one of the safest countries in the world. Crime rate is extremely low and medical care is excellent. However, it is necessary to take precaution when travelling in Iceland due to natural hazards caused by weather and nature, where conditions can change at a moments notice.

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