North Iceland

The Natural Beauty of the North

The north of Iceland truly is a land of contrasts. Its long valleys and peninsulas are interspersed with mountains, lava fields and smooth hills carved out by rivers. The deep and numerous indentations in the coast of the North are at times lush with vegetation, at others barren. As one nears the Arctic Circle in the northern latitudes, the midnight sun is invariably awe-inspiring.

The North is home to Iceland's second largest urban area, Akureyri, located in Iceland's longest fjord, the mild-weathered Eyjafjörður. Akureyri, rich in culture and history, has a charming downtown full of late nineteenth century wooden houses. In summer, golfers can take advantage of the midnight sun at the Arctic Open.

Many towns of the North are dedicated to marine life. The Húsavík Whale Museum and the Seal Center in Hvammstangi are two options for visitors. Close by in the northern reaches of the Vatnajökull National Park is the impressive Ásbyrgi Canyon, as well as the Dettifoss Waterfall—the most powerful in Europe. The nearby Lake Mývatn and its surrounding wetlands has an exceptional variety of waterbirds and rock formations.

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Close by in the northern reaches of the Vatnajökull National Park is the impressive Ásbyrgi Canyon, as well as the Dettifoss Waterfall—the most powerful in Europe.
Major towns

Akureyri, Húsavík, Sauðarkrókur and Dalvík

Regional airports

Akureyri, Grímsey, Húsavík, Sauðakrókur and Þórshöfn

Major attractions

Akureyri, Askja, Ásbyrgi, Dettifoss, Goðafoss, Jökulsárgljúfur, Mývatn and Vatnajökull National Park

Other Regions of Iceland

East Iceland

The east coast of Iceland is home to the country's largest forest, lush farmlands and a range of small fjords and islands. Thanks to the East's many natural harbors, a variety of fishing villages and small seaside communities border the coast.

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West Iceland

The western peninsula is one of Iceland's most geologically diverse regions. Its natural wonders are a nearly exhaustive sampling of all that Iceland has to offer, ranging from slumbering volcanoes and majestic waterfalls to a variety of flora and wildlife.

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Westfjords

One of Iceland's best kept secrets is undoubtedly the country's North-West corner, usually known as the Westfjords. Isolation has preserved the region in relatively unspoiled wilderness. Largely uninhabited, the Westfjords are frequently distinguished by travel guides as a destination of excellence, and are a must-see for any serious explorer.

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