The Regions of Iceland

Discover the Different Parts of Iceland

Iceland is typically divided into different geographical regions. Each region differs slightly in respect of culture and landscape,
but all are uniquely Icelandic. Find your favorite part of Iceland.  

East Iceland

The east coast of Iceland is home to the country's largest forest, lush farmlands and a range of small fjords and islands. Thanks to the East's many natural harbors, a variety of fishing villages and small seaside communities border the coast.

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West Iceland

The western peninsula is one of Iceland's most geologically diverse regions. Its natural wonders are a nearly exhaustive sampling of all that Iceland has to offer, ranging from slumbering volcanoes and majestic waterfalls to a variety of flora and wildlife.

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Westfjords

One of Iceland's best kept secrets is undoubtedly the country's North-West corner, usually known as the Westfjords. Isolation has preserved the region in relatively unspoiled wilderness. Largely uninhabited, the Westfjords are frequently distinguished by travel guides as a destination of excellence, and are a must-see for any serious explorer.

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South Iceland

The south coast of Iceland is home to some the country's most visited tourist attractions. The coastline itself is renowned for its beauty, and the towns along the coast are famous for their fresh seafood.

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Reykjanes Peninsula

The Reykjanes Peninsula is a geothermal wonder, where lighthouses outnumber villages. Besides hosting the Keflavík International Airport and, just a few minutes away, the spectacular Blue Lagoon, the Reykjanes Peninsula is a destination in its own right.

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Reykjavík

Reykjavík is the natural starting point for any visit to Iceland, and not undeservedly so. The capital city is world-renowned on all fronts; for its culture, history, and natural beauty.

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The Central Highlands

For centuries, the interior of Iceland was virtually inaccessible, for years at a time playing host only to outlaws in hiding. Via the mountain roads Kjölur and Sprengisandur, the untouched wilderness of Iceland's mountainous centre is now open to the general public—for cautious exploration by foot or 4x4 vehiclesin the summer months.

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North Iceland

The north of Iceland is truly a place of contrasts. Its long valleys and peninsulas are interspersed with mountains, lava fields and smooth hills carved out by rivers. As one nears the Arctic Circle in the northern latitudes, the midnight sun is invariably awe-inspiring.

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